Can Dogs Eat Spinach? Good or Harmful

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Can Dogs Eat Spinach? Good or Harmful

We love them. But can dogs eat spinach? This is now a question we are waiting for an answer to and we will do our best to give you an accurate answer in the following paragraphs.

Dog owners are much more likely to share their food with their dogs in the privacy of their homes. Why is this such a widespread phenomenon in the world? Maybe because we can’t get up when the dog looks at us while we eat our food. The only fact is that being dog lovers, this will prevent us from enjoying a dish while our beloved pet is staring at us.

So what can we share with our dogs? Can we share some vegetables aside from delicious meats? Can we give them some fruit or some seeds we eat? What can our dogs really eat besides dog food?

Can Dogs Eat Spinach? 

We know it’s a green leafy vegetable that brings a lot of benefits to us but can our dogs like it too? Well, the answer is yes. Dogs really like them and it can give them strength, the same goes for us.

However, moderation appears to be the key in both cases. Dogs aren’t usually that interested in these vegetables but if your dog is going to eat them, want them, and taste spinach, that’s a great thing!

The health benefits of spinach

Spinach contains a large amount of vitamins such as A, B, C, and K. It also contains beta-carotene and many fibers that have the ability to stimulate the intestinal system and promote the defecation process. This is true for both, both for people and for canines. For dogs, vitamin C and K work differently, they work to promote bone health.

If your dog is anemic, you should feed it some spinach from now on. This fantastic vegetable with its small amounts of iron is the component that the body is lacking when it is in unpleasant conditions. Add folate to your balance and you have a natural treatment for blood circulation and anemia.

Spinach is also an excellent source of lutein and zeaxanthin, two components that are good for your dog’s eyesight. They have antioxidant effects, which will offer protection for the retina from harmful processes by occurring in time and thus improving your dog’s vision capabilities.

Contraindications 

Of course, as in anything else, there are also contraindications for spinach. Apparently, some people believe that spinach blocks calcium absorption in dogs. The only thing that needs to be said here is the fact that spinach is definitely rich in oxalic acid, which in large quantities will be harmful and toxic to the dog’s kidneys. But given the fact that dogs don’t eat such a large amount of spinach, they won’t be dangerous at all if consumed in moderation.

How to serve spinach to your dog?

If you have decided to give your dog some spinach, below are some ideas on how to prepare it to make it more palatable to your furry friend. Raw vegetables than cooked vegetables are likely to create more tummy upsets, so cook the spinach before sharing it with your dog.

The process is simple, you can either steam them, sauté them. Either way, it will love them. But as far as we’re concerned, it’s not okay to boil vegetables, as it will end up on your dog’s plate with more nutritional values ​​that were lost during the boiling process. There is no reference to the taste that it will not be good and that your dog may refuse to eat them.

To make it easier to eat and digest them, we recommend cutting them. You should avoid giving your dog raw spinach because it will not only have difficulty digesting it but will also cause imbalances in its stomach.

In conclusion, dogs eat small portions of other green vegetables such as kale, beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprouts,  turnip greens, and lettuce. Therefore these are the best vegetables to give to your dog. Also, keep in mind that you should not exceed the recommended dose. An excess amount of spinach could cause stomach problems such as possible diarrhea.

This article is purely informative, at Shelterapet we do not have the right to prescribe veterinary treatments or make any type of diagnosis. We encourage you to take your pet to the vet in case of any kind of discomfort.

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About Jessica Vanclap

Passionate about animals, but also about health, I did not hesitate for long in choosing my studies. Veterinary assistant by training, I worked in a veterinary clinic for several years. I then made the choice to share my knowledge and experiences by joining the training team of a school of Veterinary Assistant and Grooming.

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