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Siamese Lynx Point: The Famously Affectionate Cat

siamese lynx point

The Siamese Lynx-Point makes an impression among cat lovers in cat rooms. Although Cat Fanciers were fascinated with the new stripped-down pattern, very few breeders expressed sufficient interest in them and consequently continued to breed only the popular semi-pointed Siamese.

As a result, the popularity of Lynx stitch has slowly gained acceptance. Despite this, the diligence of reputable breeders who had an interest in preserving the Siamese Lynx has made it possible today for many to enjoy the unique beauty and personality of these purebred cats.

The Lynx point retains the exoticism of their larger cousin the Siberian tiger and with striped tiger dots, ivory bodies, lively blue eyes, exotic appearance, and famously affectionate.

History Of The Siamese Lynx Point 

The history of the Colorpoint Shorthair begins as early as 1902 when “tabby point Siamese” were produced and these were mentioned in a book called “The Book of the Cat” by Frances Simpson. They first appeared in Scotland, and more recently in 1944 – 1949, where they were referred to as “Silverpoint Siamese”.

They only became widely known in the years when they were introduced in 1960 at a cat show in London, England. In 1966, they achieved recognition by the Cat Fancy Board of Directors (GCCF) as Tabby Point Siamese and these cats are the basis of today’s Colorpoint Shorthair.

siamese lynx point

Physical Characteristics of The Siamese Lynx 

Colorpoint Shorthairs are the first cousins ​​of the Siamese. This breed is distinguished by its different “point” colors, sixteen in number compared to the four colors of the Siamese. Half-siblings of the Siamese By virtue of their founding and continued breeding with the Siamese, the Colorpoint Shorthair is a hybrid breed of the Siamese.

The term “Colorpoint Shorthair” was coined to cover Siamese cats in other colors and patterns in registers that do not wish to include in the Siamese breed group.

Over time the first hybrids gained popularity, the tiger versions of the Siamese were introduced in the Colorpoint Shorthair programs in the four Siamese color varieties.

In CFA, these pointy tabby cats are called Lynx-Points (Snow Tiger) and are exhibited in their own “Lynx-Point class” like

  • Seal-Lynx point
  • Chocolate-Lynx point
  • Blue-Lynx points
  • Lilac-points
  • Lynx point
  • red Lynx point
  • Cream Lynx point

The development of the tabby point pattern was more than an accidental breeding between the domestic tabby and the Siamese breed. The offspring of a cross between a domestic tabby and a Siamese results in kittens that have retained the points of the Siamese and expressed in bands, as opposed to the original solid markings of the Siamese.

From the Siamese side, they have retained the colored dots gene, and from their solid-colored ancestor, they have retained a variety of point colors.

Selective breeding between these hybrids to other Siamese breed improve and intensify the marking, type, and color of the eyes.

The physical characteristics of the Lynx Siamese have evolved over time and the current standards are as follows:

  • The stature: The Siamese is a slender cat of medium size. Its frame is rather thin without tending towards thinness. Shoulders and hips should be the same width.
  • The Siamese coat is short, fine, silky, and shiny.
  • The dress of the Lynx must be colorpoint without obligation of color. What is important in the Siamese is that the color and the points must be contrasting. The mask and the tips of the legs should be darker than the rest of the body.
  • The eyes are almond-shaped, medium in size, and always blue in color. They are spaced and tilted towards the nose.
  • The ears are large, broad at the base, and set apart.
  • The tail is thin, whip-shaped. Its length is proportional to that of the body and to the height of the legs.
siamese lynx point

Lynx Point Siamese: character

Often referred to as a cat-dog, the Siamese is a cat with a very particular character, very different from that of other breeds of cats. Indeed, the Siamese is a very demanding cat towards Its master, always in search of its attention. Here are the character traits that are often found in the Lynx point cat:

  • affectionate
  • soft
  • endearing
  • capricious
  • lively
  • clever
  • attentive
  • faithful
  • possessive
  • jealous
  • player

 

The Lynx Siamese cat is a very possessive cat. In general, It will designate one of the family members as Its master and build an intense relationship with It, which it will demonstrate by following It everywhere, physically, and with It many meows! Indeed, the Siamese is a very talkative cat, which can present a disadvantage.

Possessive, the Siamese can be invasive. If It feels that Its master is being attacked, It will not hesitate to take Its defense. Jealous, the Siamese will have difficulty cohabiting with other pets that could distract from its master.

Despite a character that could be described as difficult, the Siamese, fortunately, has many other qualities. It’s an affectionate and highly intelligent cat, so It reacts when called and quickly understands the prohibitions.

It is therefore a cat that lends itself better to training than other breeds of cats. It’s also a very playful cat, so care should be taken to leave enough toys available for It to use up Its energy.

The Siamese Lynx cat is therefore a cat made for those who wish to have a very present companion and who will know how to deal with its very particular character.

What does a Lynx Point Siamese eat?

The Lynx Point is a thin and slender cat, but he is prone to overweight. It is important to watch his diet in order to limit excessive weight gain, which could cause him problems, because of its long and thin legs, which cannot carry too much weight.

It is therefore advisable to give your Siamese food adapted to its age, its physical condition, or whether It’s sterilized or not. Indeed, a sterilized Siamese cat will have much lower energy needs than its unsterilized counterparts.

Although it’s very fond of it, avoid giving your Siamese dairy or creamy products. Indeed, It will have difficulty digesting them. Human food is also not recommended.

It is much more advisable to give premium cat food to your Siamese. Indeed, high-end kibbles have a double advantage: on the one hand, they are more nutritious. On the other hand, they force your Siamese to chew, which helps prevent certain oral problems in the long term.

If you are unsure of what food to give your Lynx cat, ask your vet. He/She will be able to advise you on the most suitable food for your Siamese.

siamese lynx point

What diseases is the Lynx Point Siamese predisposed to?

Siamese are predisposed to urinary problems. It is therefore important to provide It with fresh water so that it can drink often.

The Siamese cat also has a predisposition for pulmonary diseases such as asthma, or even certain heart diseases.

Finally, the Siamese cat is particularly affected by feline amyloidosis. This disease usually manifests in cats one to five years old, but does not exclude older cats. It manifests in the form of kidney failure or internal bleeding from the liver or pancreas, but also from other organs.

This disease is genetic and its trigger mode remains unknown, but some laboratories are aware of this research and in the course of developing a genetic test to detect this disease.

If in doubt, we strongly advise you to contact your veterinarian.

Price of a Lynx Point Siamese

Price of a Lynx Point Siamese: from $ 600 to $ 1,200

In terms of maintenance, it takes between $ 500 and $ 800 per year.

The Lynx Point Siamese cat has a very special personality. The Siamese can be jealous and possessive and will not be able to be satisfied with a master who ignores It or does not pay It enough attention. In addition, Its master or future master should expect a chatty cat and be patient when necessary.

However, the Siamese Lynx Point, fortunately, has many qualities: endearing, affectionate, it will be an ideal companion for owners who wish to develop a special relationship with their cat.

Written by Amanda

Passionate about animals, Amanda draws her expertise from her training as an educator, canine behaviorist as well as her extensive experience with animal owners. A specialist in dog and cat behavior, Amanda continues to learn about our four-legged companions by studying veterinary reference books but also university research sites (UCD, Utrecht, Cambridge, Cornell, etc..)

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