Why Does My Guinea Pig Bite Me?

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Why Does My Guinea Pig Bite Me?

Guinea pigs are fantastic pets that are generally friendly in nature. Most of these cute little creatures don’t bite because, being kind, when they do they have a good reason for doing so. Actually, a newborn guinea pig might give you a clamp, but only because he is still learning and exploring his world. Like all newborn animals, they are testing their limits.

It is important for owners to understand that guinea pigs communicate in all possible ways, so if they bite it means they are not happy about something. It could also be because they are in pain. The guinea pig’s personality is usually learned, which helps to tell if something is missing or not. But if you are new to the world of these little critters, it may take you some time to understand them and the things they do.

Situations in which a Guinea Pig Might Bite

As previously mentioned, a guinea pig generally bites when it is unhappy about something and that includes being picked up and carried around. These animals do not like to be carried or taken because this makes them very nervous.

If caught in a certain way, your puppy may bite you just to remind you that it doesn’t like that situation. Also, if there is a lot of noise or the guinea pig is in an unfamiliar situation, it may get scared and bite you hard.

Guinea Pigs Need to Empty – All the Time!

The other thing to keep in mind is that if you pick up your guinea pig and hold it while it has to urinate, it will start squirming to free itself from its grip. You may end up with a clamp that you shouldn’t ignore because if you do it next time it may bite you harder to make you understand the lesson.

Guinea pigs need to empty their bladders on average every 15-20 minutes, so you should be careful and check when you want to pick them up.

Check it has no mints

If your guinea pig is usually good and gentle but then suddenly starts biting you, you should check for parasites or ticks. Your pig may also be sick which obviously means it should be taken to the vet. If it has ticks, it may become very sensitive to touch and thus relieve pain by biting you.

The problem is that ticks on guinea pigs are invisible to the naked eye but can be passed from one pup to another. You, therefore, need a specific treatment that your veterinarian will advise and prescribe.

You will have to repeat the treatment 2 or 3 times to get rid of ticks, which are very powerful parasites. It is very important that you treat your guinea pigs well when they have ticks, as they could be fatal if not treated.

Medical Checkups Are Essential

You should always get your guinea pigs checked by the vet as they may get a toothache, and thus bite you. Their back molars cause a condition called malocclusion . You may find it chewing on things in their cages very frequently and when you catch it, it bites you.

Malocclusion is a very serious condition that can be fatal if not treated due to the fact that your guinea pig will stop eating due to the pain and discomfort caused by it.

Other reasons why your guinea pig might bite you :

  • Your little pig wants to scold you
  • Guinea pigs don’t like being touched in sensitive places on their bodies, including their hump
  • They hate when you caress them on the wrong side; always caress them on the side where their hair grows
  • Your guinea pig may want a larger cage because a small one makes it nervous

Final Thoughts

Most guinea pigs are friendly and gentle. However, if they are unhappy with a situation or are in pain, they will give you a bite to let you know.

That said, some guinea pigs have a spoiled attitude to something that happened to them while they were little. If that’s the case, you have to show a lot of patience and be careful when you touch and heal it.

Once it starts to trust you, you can stop taking it with a grain of salt, but this may take a while. The only thing you should never do is punish your guinea pig because it will end up scaring it, which could make things worse.

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About Amanda

Passionate about animals, Amanda draws her expertise from her training as an educator, pet behaviorist as well as her extensive experience with animal owners. A specialist in dog and cat behavior, Amanda continues to learn about our four-legged companions by studying veterinary reference books but also university research sites (UCD, Utrecht, Cambridge, Cornell, etc..)

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